Navratri Day 9: Worshipping Devi Siddhidatri through artwork

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Devi  (or Goddess) Siddhidatri is ninth and the final form among the nine embodiments of Goddess Durga and is worshipped on the ninth day of Navratri, just a day before Vijay Dashami or Dusshera.

To know about the Goddess’ previous form – Mahagauri, read my blog post: Navratri Day 8: Worshipping Devi Mahagauri through artwork

This is the coloured sketch, I made, of Goddess Siddhidatri.

Siddhidatri

According to Vedic scriptures especially the ‘Devi Bhagvata Purana’,  Lord Shiva worshipped the Goddess and was blessed with all Siddhis. Siddhis are spiritual, paranormal, supernatural or magical powers, abilities, and attainments that are the products of spiritual advancement through meditation and yoga. By the Goddess’ blessings, Shiva’s half body became female and other half body male in the avatar of Ardhnarishwar.

Ardhanarishwar

Since She offers all types of Siddhis to her devotees, she is called Siddhidatri – the giver of Siddhis.

The Goddess  is depicted with four arms and she is shown sitting on a lotus flower. Her arms hold Gada (mace), Chakra (discus), Shankh (scallop shell) and a lotus flower. She is draped in a red saree and her mount is lion. She is surrounded by not only humans but also by Devas, Gandharva, Asura, and Yaksha alike in a worshipping gesture.

Today, the air reverberates with the Sanskrit verses in reverence to the Goddess.

Ya devi sarva bhutesu, Siddhidatri rupena sansthita
Namastasyai, namastasyai, namastasyai, namo namaha!

(in English)

The goddess who is omnipresent as the divine Siddhidatri .
I bow to her, I bow to her, I bow to her again & again.

 

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Navratri Day 8: Worshipping Devi Mahagauri through artwork

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Devi  (or Goddess) Mahagauri is eighth among the nine embodiments of Goddess Durga and is worshipped on the eighth day of Navratri.

To know about the Goddess’ previous form – Kaalratri, read my blog post: Navratri Day 7: Worshipping Devi Kaaratri through artwork

This is the coloured sketch, I made, of Goddess Mahagauri .

Mahagauri

According to Hindu mythology, when Parvati did severe penance to please Lord Shiva, the severity of her penance  turned her body color dark. When Lord Shiva accepted her great devotion, he washed her body with pure water of the river Ganges that made her body completely Gour (or white). Hence, her name ‘Gauri‘ came into being. ‘Maha’ means ‘great’. So the name Mahagauri.

Goddess Mahagauri is depicted with an extremely fair complexion and with four hands. She carries Trishul (trident) in one right hand and keeps the second right hand in Abhay mudra (assuring safety and bliss). She adorns Damaru (two-headed drum)in one left hand and keeps the second left hand in Varada mudra (dispensing boons).

Today, the air reverberates with the Sanskrit verses in reverence to the Goddess.

Ya devi sarva bhutesu, Mahagauri rupena sansthita
Namastasyai, namastasyai, namastasyai, namo namaha!

(in English)

The goddess who is omnipresent as the divine Mahagauri  .
I bow to her, I bow to her, I bow to her again & again.

To know about the Goddess’ ninth and final form – Siddhidatri, read my blog post: Navratri Day 9: Worshipping Devi Siddhidatri through artwork

Navratri Day 7: Worshipping Devi Kaalratri through artwork

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Devi  (or Goddess) Kaalratri is seventh among the nine embodiments of Goddess Durga and is worshipped on the seventh day of Navratri.

To know about the Goddess’ previous form – Katyayani, read my blog post: Navratri Day 6: Worshipping Devi Katyayani through artwork

This is the coloured sketch, I made, of Goddess Kaalratri .

Kaalratri

According to Hindu Mythology,  there existed a ferocious demon named Raktabeej, who was blessed with an extraordinary boon that  one drop of his scattered blood was able to form a duplicate of him. Hence, in one way, he was invincible in a battle that involved bloodshed as drops of blood could form billions of the copies of the demon. The Gods pleaded to Goddess Parvati to help them out of their woes and she complied.She took the form of  Kaalratri and used a vessel to catch every drop of blood scattered from the demon’s body, while battling him. Her extremely violent appearance terrified Raktabeej as well as the other demons.  The demon was soon slayed by the divine Goddess.

Goddess Kaalratri is depicted with a dark complexion, disheveled hair and a fierce appearance. However, her nature is highly benevolent to her devotees. She is draped only in a red garment, tiger skin and flashes a lightning necklace around her neck. She has three eyes and her breath spews fire. Her mount is the donkey. Her raised right hand is in Varada mudra (dispensing boons) and her right lower hand is in Abhay mudra (assuring safety and bliss). Her left lower hand holds a thorn-like weapon, made of iron and there is a dagger in the upper left hand.

Today, the air reverberates with the Sanskrit verses in reverence to the Goddess.

Ya devi sarva bhutesu, Kaalratri rupena sansthita
Namastasyai, namastasyai, namastasyai, namo namaha!

(in English)

The goddess who is omnipresent as the divine Kaalratri  .
I bow to her, I bow to her, I bow to her again & again.

To know about the Goddess’ eighth form – Mahagauri, read my blog post: Navratri Day 8: Worshipping Devi Mahagauri through artwork

Navratri Day 6: Worshipping Devi Katyayani through artwork

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Devi  (or Goddess) Katyayani is sixth among the nine embodiments of Goddess Durga and is worshipped on the sixth day of Navratri.

To know about the Goddess’ previous form – Skandamata, read my blog post: Navratri Day 5: Worshipping Devi Skandamata through artwork

This is the coloured sketch, I made, of Goddess Katyayani .

Katyayini

According to Hindu Mythology, it is believed that once upon a time, there lived a renowned sage called ‘Maharishi Kat‘, who had a son named Katya. Katya was a great devotee of Goddess Durga and performed eras of tough penance to please Her. The Goddess was highly pleased by his devotion and asked him to wish for a boon. He prayed to the Goddess to take birth as his daughter, which the Goddess accepted. At the home of Rishi Katya, Goddess Durga was born as his daughter.  The name Katyayani hence came into origin.

The Goddess is depicted  with four arms. Her upper left hand holds a sword and the lower left hand holds a lotus flower. Her upper right hand is in Abhay mudra (assuring safety and bliss), and lower right hand is in Varada mudra (dispensing boons). The lion is her majestic mount.

Today, the air reverberates with the Sanskrit verses in reverence to the Goddess.

Ya devi sarva bhutesu, Katyayani rupena sansthita
Namastasyai, namastasyai, namastasyai, namo namaha!

(in English)

The goddess who is omnipresent as the divine Katyayani  .
I bow to her, I bow to her, I bow to her again & again.

To know about the Goddess’ seventh form – Kaalratri, read my blog post: Navratri Day 7: Worshipping Devi Kaalratri through artwork

Navratri Day 5: Worshipping Devi Skandamata through artwork

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Devi  (or Goddess) Skandamata is fifth among the nine embodiments of Goddess Durga and is worshipped on the fifth day of Navratri.

To know about the Goddess’ previous form – Kushmanda, read my blog post: Navratri Day 4: Worshipping Devi Kushmanda through artwork

This is the coloured sketch, I made, of Goddess Skandamata .

Skandamata

‘Skanda‘ refers to  Lord Kartikeya, and ‘Mata’ means mother.  This, Goddess Parvati is called Skandamata as she is the mother of the warrior God, who was chosen by Gods as their commander in chief in the war against the demons. According to Hindu mythology, there existed a fierce demon named Tarkasur who pleased Lord Brahma after severe penance. He asked Lord Brahma to bless him with immortality, however the boon was denied, as none could escape death. Tarkasur used his wits and asked for a death at the hands of Lord Shiva‘s son, since he believed Lord Shiva, being a hermit, would never marry and hence not bear children. Blessed with the unique boon, the demon began his destruction of the world and spread mayhem everywhere. Sensing the imminent peril, the Gods requested Lord Shiva to get married to Goddess Parvati. Soon, their child, Lord Kartikeya or Skand Kumar was born and he fulfilled his destiny by slaying Tarkasur.  Skandamata is a symbol of the mother-son relationship.

The Goddess is depicted  with the infant Lord Skanda on her lap. She has four arms and three eyes, holds the infant Skanda in her right upper arm and holds two lotuses in her other 2 arms. One of her hand is posed to grant boons with grace. She has a bright complexion and is seated on her mount, the lion.

Today, the air reverberates with the Sanskrit verses in reverence to the Goddess.

Ya devi sarva bhutesu, Skandamata rupena sansthita
Namastasyai, namastasyai, namastasyai, namo namaha!

(in English)

The goddess who is omnipresent as the divine Skandamata  .
I bow to her, I bow to her, I bow to her again & again.

To know about the Goddess’ sixth form – Katyayani, read my blog post: Navratri Day 6: Worshipping Devi Katyayani through artwork